Et In Arcadia Ego

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Wedge & Lever   |   http://wedgeandlever.com

"A self-initiated project exploring the beer and wine category. For the brand story we created a fictitious narrative combined with historical facts from the Salem witch trials. From there we built out the brand and product line by integrating the occult theme into all aspects of this case study."

Our design philosophy draws on the ability to communicate ideas, provide meaningful responses and aesthetically unique outcomes. We take complex ideas and communicate them in simple, effective and intelligent ways by working closely with our clients to understand their specific needs so that we may deliver the best possible project outcome.

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So they took the marketing concept from Bruichladdich Black Arts and took it too the nth degree. Interesting. BlackArts

(via mychronosynchronicity)

18 year old Caol Ila and a Bloody Mary made with Ardmore, courtesy of the Scotch Malt Whisky Society.

Yum!

18 year old Caol Ila and a Bloody Mary made with Ardmore, courtesy of the Scotch Malt Whisky Society.

Yum!

malts-grapes:

THE WORLD’S 10 LARGEST SCOTCH WHISKY BRANDS
http://www.thespiritsbusiness.com/2013/06/the-worlds-10-largest-scotch-whisky-brands/11/
And there are several here I’ve never heard of…

Know em well. Feel free to fire any questions my way.

malts-grapes:

THE WORLD’S 10 LARGEST SCOTCH WHISKY BRANDS

http://www.thespiritsbusiness.com/2013/06/the-worlds-10-largest-scotch-whisky-brands/11/

And there are several here I’ve never heard of…

Know em well. Feel free to fire any questions my way.

(via 3drunkencelts)

The whisky collection is back up to full strength. Yum.

The whisky collection is back up to full strength. Yum.

It’s that time of year again in the Scotch Malt Whisky Society…!

It’s that time of year again in the Scotch Malt Whisky Society…!

Just bought the most retro chair imaginable. It’s like it was meant for reading leather bound books and drinking scotch.

Just bought the most retro chair imaginable. It’s like it was meant for reading leather bound books and drinking scotch.

My Scotch Malt Whisky Society membership pack.

Sweet Jesus it’s beautiful..

My Scotch Malt Whisky Society membership pack.

Sweet Jesus it’s beautiful..

Three delightful bottlings from the late Caledonian distillery. The Haymarket icon may be gone, but its whisky lives on in these incredible releases from the Scotch Malt Whisky Society.

Three delightful bottlings from the late Caledonian distillery. The Haymarket icon may be gone, but its whisky lives on in these incredible releases from the Scotch Malt Whisky Society.

The whisky glass collection grows…

The whisky glass collection grows…

Casks ready to be filled at Deanston distillery.

Casks ready to be filled at Deanston distillery.

After much anticipation, I finally got the chance to sample the eighteen year old expression from the venerable Islay distiller, Bunnahhabhain (Bun-ah-hav-in).

The twelve year old from this Burn Stewart (Black Bottle, Deanston, Tobermory) owned distillery is one of my favourite go-to drams and the somewhat limited 25 year old edition is delectable; so it was with some excitement that I finally got round to tasting this one.

Uncharacteristic for an Islay malt, Bunnahhabhain is peated to such a low level that is only just making an appearance in the 12yro and is as good as absent from the 18 and 25 year old iterations. While a small amount of the barley used is peated during malting, interaction with the cask during the maturation process causes the “peatiness” to subside over the years.

On a less spirit-centric note, Burn Stewart have just been bought (for the not insubstantial sum of £160 million) by the South African drinks company Distell, meaning that over the next few years we may see changes made to both the spirit and its distribution internationally.

But on to the whisky!

Nose:

Surprisingly sweet, vanilla, pastry, chopped nuts and spice all present.

Palate:

Honey and spice, light oak, dried fruits.

Finish:

Short and sweet, with lingering dried fruit and spice.

Overall, the subtlety of this dram surprised me. I’m not entirely sure how I feel about it. I think a few more drams and a more concentrated tasting is required.

Certainly not offensive though!

After much anticipation, I finally got the chance to sample the eighteen year old expression from the venerable Islay distiller, Bunnahhabhain (Bun-ah-hav-in).

The twelve year old from this Burn Stewart (Black Bottle, Deanston, Tobermory) owned distillery is one of my favourite go-to drams and the somewhat limited 25 year old edition is delectable; so it was with some excitement that I finally got round to tasting this one.

Uncharacteristic for an Islay malt, Bunnahhabhain is peated to such a low level that is only just making an appearance in the 12yro and is as good as absent from the 18 and 25 year old iterations. While a small amount of the barley used is peated during malting, interaction with the cask during the maturation process causes the “peatiness” to subside over the years.

On a less spirit-centric note, Burn Stewart have just been bought (for the not insubstantial sum of £160 million) by the South African drinks company Distell, meaning that over the next few years we may see changes made to both the spirit and its distribution internationally.

But on to the whisky!

Nose:

Surprisingly sweet, vanilla, pastry, chopped nuts and spice all present.

Palate:

Honey and spice, light oak, dried fruits.

Finish:

Short and sweet, with lingering dried fruit and spice.

Overall, the subtlety of this dram surprised me. I’m not entirely sure how I feel about it. I think a few more drams and a more concentrated tasting is required.

Certainly not offensive though!

A long, long time ago. But I can still remember how that JD used to make me smile.

A long, long time ago. But I can still remember how that JD used to make me smile.

(Source: eveninarcadia)

Found these from years ago. Pretty sure I posted them at the time. But here they are again, in all their nostalgic glory.

So I tried the Ardbeg “Ardbog” today…
This year’s ‘limited’ edition Ardbeg is named for the peat bogs from which the famous Islay malt garners it’s characteristically smoky flavour. By drying their barley using peat cut from bogs on the island, Ardbeg’s whisky is infused (at least for the standard 10yro bottling) at 24 parts per million phenols. 
The packaging is covered in a selection of sketches, depicting the various archaeological curiosities found in the Islay bogs over the years. Paying homage to both the wetland’s almost unrivalled preservative properties and the all important ‘young coal’, to which Ardbeg owes its distinctive character.
But who cares about the packaging and the marketing mumbo jumbo? On to the spirit itself!
The Ardbog has been created by blending bourbon-cask spirit with whisky matured in casks formerly used to hold Manzanilla, a form of fino sherry from Cádiz, a province in Spain’s southern-most region, Andalucía. Like its predecessors it has been bottled at cask strength - this time 52.1% - so I sampled it both with and without water. 
But what was it like? I hear you cry. Wait no longer, here are my tasting notes:
Nose:
Resounding aromas of salted nuts and toffee, caramel sweetness interwoven with the customary smoke. A slight herbal twinge and.. is that smoked bacon?! With water, the peat opens up a little to reveal more cut herbs and a savoury note that reminds me of salty smoked bacon or perhaps cured ham. 
Palate: 
True to the nose, salted cashew nuts, almonds and toffee. Big peat and an oily mouth-feel, but surprisingly mellow for a cask-strength dram. That cooked meat starts to appear when… It’s gone. All that’s left is the normal Ardbeg smoke and citrus. 
Finish:
"Tastes like Ardbeg". Nothing characteristically "Arbog". Somewhat short and improves only slightly with water. Finishes much like the Sopranos, in the middle of a - *credits roll*.
~
Being a fan of Ardbeg, I enjoyed the Ardbog - even though the palate didn’t have as much of the Manzanilla influence as I expected. The finish however was disappointing and let down an otherwise intriguing dram.
Despite having some lovely features, much of it felt a little too similar to previous iterations. After thinking it over, the dram has put me in mind that perhaps they didn’t have enough Manzanilla matured stock to support a full roll out, so increased the proportion of bourbon matured spirit in order to meet the required bottle quota for their annual release. But that’s just conjecture. Either way, I feel that it would have benefited from a slightly higher proportion of the Manzanilla cask spirit.
Overall, worth trying a dram. Unless you’re a collector or have £80 to burn needlessly I wouldn’t bother buying a bottle.

So I tried the Ardbeg “Ardbog” today…

This year’s ‘limited’ edition Ardbeg is named for the peat bogs from which the famous Islay malt garners it’s characteristically smoky flavour. By drying their barley using peat cut from bogs on the island, Ardbeg’s whisky is infused (at least for the standard 10yro bottling) at 24 parts per million phenols. 

The packaging is covered in a selection of sketches, depicting the various archaeological curiosities found in the Islay bogs over the years. Paying homage to both the wetland’s almost unrivalled preservative properties and the all important ‘young coal’, to which Ardbeg owes its distinctive character.

But who cares about the packaging and the marketing mumbo jumbo? On to the spirit itself!

The Ardbog has been created by blending bourbon-cask spirit with whisky matured in casks formerly used to hold Manzanilla, a form of fino sherry from Cádiz, a province in Spain’s southern-most region, Andalucía. Like its predecessors it has been bottled at cask strength - this time 52.1% - so I sampled it both with and without water. 

But what was it like? I hear you cry. Wait no longer, here are my tasting notes:

Nose:

Resounding aromas of salted nuts and toffee, caramel sweetness interwoven with the customary smoke. A slight herbal twinge and.. is that smoked bacon?! 

With water, the peat opens up a little to reveal more cut herbs and a savoury note that reminds me of salty smoked bacon or perhaps cured ham. 

Palate: 

True to the nose, salted cashew nuts, almonds and toffee. Big peat and an oily mouth-feel, but surprisingly mellow for a cask-strength dram. That cooked meat starts to appear when… It’s gone. All that’s left is the normal Ardbeg smoke and citrus. 

Finish:

"Tastes like Ardbeg". Nothing characteristically "Arbog". Somewhat short and improves only slightly with water. Finishes much like the Sopranos, in the middle of a - *credits roll*.

~

Being a fan of Ardbeg, I enjoyed the Ardbog - even though the palate didn’t have as much of the Manzanilla influence as I expected. The finish however was disappointing and let down an otherwise intriguing dram.

Despite having some lovely features, much of it felt a little too similar to previous iterations. After thinking it over, the dram has put me in mind that perhaps they didn’t have enough Manzanilla matured stock to support a full roll out, so increased the proportion of bourbon matured spirit in order to meet the required bottle quota for their annual release. But that’s just conjecture. Either way, I feel that it would have benefited from a slightly higher proportion of the Manzanilla cask spirit.

Overall, worth trying a dram. Unless you’re a collector or have £80 to burn needlessly I wouldn’t bother buying a bottle.

Look what I found…

Released in 2008, yet hiding on a shelf in 2013. Never tried it before, but picked it up for the simple reason that one day I can neck it and say “this is one of the last bottles in the world!”. Good times.

Look what I found…

Released in 2008, yet hiding on a shelf in 2013. Never tried it before, but picked it up for the simple reason that one day I can neck it and say “this is one of the last bottles in the world!”. Good times.

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